It's great when your little one finds peace and comfort in his or her soother. But there comes a time when you wonder if it's time to wean.

On this page, you can read about when it's time to change the soother and how you can do it - especially if your baby is very fond of his soother.

When should you wean your baby from his soother?

Due to teething, it is recommended that the child is weaned from its soother between 3 and 3.5 years at the latest. For reasons of oral motor skills and language, it is a good idea to minimise the use of the soother from the start, until when the child is asleep or upset. Now that this is in place, most parents know that this is much easier said than done. This leads us on to the next section.

Is your child very fond of the pacifier?

Many children love their soothers, and getting them away can be a challenge. In fact, it only gets harder the older the child gets, as he or she can verbally express a clear desire for the soother. This is where you need to use your best pedagogical methods to make it a good experience for both child and adult.

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Beware of forcing a suck stop

A bit like blestop, it's a good idea to have the child on board for the project. If the child is forced and experiences a great longing for his or her pacifier, the child may feel abandoned and that he or she is not being heard.

Weaning a 3 year old child from using a pacifier - How to do it!

Once you've decided that the pacifier needs to go, it's a good idea to do it over a holiday or extended weekend. The baby will undoubtedly react to the pacifier being gone, perhaps with crying and poor sleep. So make sure you have the energy to give your child extra support.

Cold turkey or rehab?

Whether it's cold turkey or rehab is up to you and your child. It must be an individual judgement. The most common is probably to start by limiting use to night time, and then cut them out completely.

Last but not least... Remember, no child shows up on the first day of school with a pacifier in their mouth!

Why stop using a pacifier?

Here are 3 good reasons to say goodbye to the dear pacifier.

Pacifier and language development

When the pacifier is in the mouth, it is obviously difficult to speak properly. Around 2 - 3 years of age, the child's language is developing very quickly, and it is therefore a good idea to limit or completely stop using the soother during this period, and at least work towards getting rid of it completely, both at home and in the nursery.

Suttebid

Too long and too much use of the soother causes the baby to suck. A teat bite is when the teeth simply form to the teat. This is particularly noticeable on the front teeth, which can become set at an angle and point out. This is where you need to consult your dentist and find out if there is cause for concern. The good thing is that children's baby teeth can quickly straighten back into normal position once they are no longer using a soother.

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The pacifier passivates the child

When the baby sucks on its soother, it relaxes and perhaps closes in on itself for a while. This is not so appropriate in situations where the child needs to play and develop. For example, in nursery. It also helps to keep the child in a kind of "baby role" - also from the point of view of other peers. Therefore, consider whether the soother should be completely removed before the child starts kindergarten.

What to do with the last suckers?

If your child is over 3, you can talk about replacing the soother with a cosy comfort teddy bear or perhaps a toy, if your child wants one. Your child can go with you to a shop to return their soothers and choose a teddy bear instead.

It may be easier for some children to cope with no longer using a soother if they know where it is, or they may have been given something else instead. There are several ideas for getting rid of the soother in a good way:

  • Hang the pacifier on a tree. There are trees all over the country in parks and similar places.
  • Give the pacifier to a clerk in a toy store, in exchange for a gift or a teddy bear
  • Sending the presents to Santa Claus (he actually has an address in Greenland)
  • Drop off the soothers at a recycling shop